What Is Non- Mulbery Silk or Tassar Silk?

Non Mulberry Silk By Charu Creation, Nehru Place, New Delhi

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I’ll describe first of the 3 non-mulbery silks.The Tasar. Eri and Muga are the other 2 non mulberry silks. Non mulberry silks are also called wild silks or Vanya Silks. Tasar Silk has 2 variations A) Tropical Tasar B) Oak Tasar Tropical Tasar: Tasar (Tussah) is a coarse silk copperish in colour, mainly used for furnishings and interiors.

It is less lustrous than mulberry silk, but has its own feel and appeal. Tasar silk is generated by the silkworm, Antheraea mylitta which mainly thrives on the trees Asan and Arjun. In India, tasar silk is largely tended by tribals in the Gondwana belt comprising of states like Jharkhand, Chattisgarh and Orissa, besides Maharashtra, West Bengal and Andhra Pradesh. India is the exclusive producer of Tasar Silk also called Indian Tasar. Oak Tasar: It is a finer variety of tasar generated by the silkworm, Antheraea proyeli J. in India.This silkworm feeds on natural food plants of oak, found in abundance in the sub-Himalayan belt of India covering the states of Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttrakhand, Assam, Meghalaya and Manipur.

China is the major producer of oak tasar in the world and this comes from another silkworm which is known as Antheraea pernyi. Oak tasar (also known as temperate tasar) is mainly used for furnishing, dress materials and sarees. Bomkai, Paithani, Ikkat (tie & dye) and Katki are some popular fabrics produced using tasar silks. Bafta is a popular blend of tasar and cotton.Shawls and mufflers are also produced using a blend of oak tasar and other natural fibers like wool, cotton, etc Tasar fabric can also be printed, hand-painted, or, even embroidered into traditional sarees and beautiful dress-materials.

In fact, in India, it is said that a bride’s trousseau is never complete without a saree made of Tasar Silk! To know more about fabrics you may connect us at +91-99711 06200 or visit us at charu.org.in Do remember to watch my next video in which I will describe another non-mulbery Silk called Eri silk.

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